Global Health Faculty Members Receive WGHA Awards

Dr. Benjamin Anderson and Dr. Jillian Pintye were both recently recognized by the Washington Global Health Alliance (WGHA) with a pair of awards. Winners were selected by a panel of global health experts chaired by Erin McCarthy, senior program officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and WGHA board member. Anderson, a professor of Global Health, earned the Pioneers Award for Impact. Pintye, an Assistant Professor Global Health, received the Pioneers Rising Leader honor. 

Geekwire: University of Washington Initiative Awarded $9.3M to Fight Deadly Malaria Strains in India

By Clare McGrane

Viruses and parasites are constantly changing. That’s the reason last year’s flu shot isn’t as effective against this year’s flu — the virus has evolved to resist it.

The same is true for malaria, but unlike the flu, malaria is one of the most deadly parasites in the world, and it’s becoming resistant to the lifesaving drugs that can cure it.

Nature Research Honors Julie Overbaugh, PhD, for Lifetime of Mentoring

Julie Overbaugh, PhD, Affiliate Professor in the UW Department of Global Health, scientist and member at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Endowed Chair of Graduate Education, received the lifetime achievement Nature Award for Mentoring in Science and a $10,000 prize in December. Nature hosts these annual awards to champion the importance of mentoring and inspiring a generation of young scientists.

VOA News: Genetically Engineered Vaccine Prevents Malaria in Mice, Findings Show

By Jessica Berman

A genetically engineered malaria vaccine has been shown to prevent the disease in mice, researchers say. The findings offer hope of halting the illness in humans, as well as stopping transmission of the mosquito-borne disease.

Researchers at the Center for Infectious Disease Research (CIDR) at the University of Washington, in conjunction with the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center, have developed a vaccine that uses the entire malaria-causing parasite — called P. falciparum — to stimulate a protective immune response.

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