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Department News

Global Health Professor Receives $1.4 Million Grant to Study New Technologies in Tuberculosis Testing

A new grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will allow Paul Drain, a professor in the UW Department of Global Health, to conduct clinical evaluation studies of point-of-care tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic tests. These rapid tests deliver quick results to patients and clinicians in hospital and community clinics. By accelerating the initiation of TB treatment, patients may have better outcomes and will be less likely to transmit TB to others.

Global Health Professor Receives Grant to Investigate Innovative Detection Methods to Eliminate Intestinal Worm Infections

Judd Walson, a University of Washington professor of Global Health, Medicine, and Pediatrics, recently received $621,029 in funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for a research grant focused on the development of a molecular diagnostic platform for the detection of soil transmitted helminths (STH), commonly known as parasitic worms. Investigators will use these methods to support a large, multi-country, randomized trial evaluating the feasibility of interrupting STH transmission through expanded mass drug administration.

Global Health Faculty Members Receive WGHA Awards

Dr. Benjamin Anderson and Dr. Jillian Pintye were both recently recognized by the Washington Global Health Alliance (WGHA) with a pair of awards. Winners were selected by a panel of global health experts chaired by Erin McCarthy, senior program officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and WGHA board member. Anderson, a professor of Global Health, earned the Pioneers Award for Impact. Pintye, an Assistant Professor Global Health, received the Pioneers Rising Leader honor. 

Global Health Professor Receives Grant to Study Effectiveness of Doxycycline to Reduce STIs

A recently awarded grant will allow Connie Celum, a University of Washington professor of Global Health and Medicine, to evaluate whether doxycycline—an antibiotic commonly used to treat acne and Lyme disease—is safe and effective in reducing bacterial sexually transmitted infections. The study focuses on men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW) living with HIV and taking pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a daily pill used to prevent HIV.

In the Media

A Climate-focused Presidential Debate? Here’s What Moderators Should Ask

Jay Inslee, the governor of Washington state, has said climate change is the “driving motivation” for his presidential campaign; some of his opponents agree, particularly after an April CNN/SSRS poll found that 82 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters described the issue as “very important.” One of these candidates will face off in the general election against a president who ran on the assurance that “I believe in clean air. Immaculate air.

BMJ Editorial: Protect the Independence of Global Health Research

Seven University of Washington faculty members recently joined more than 200 researchers from 40 different countries in a call to action to protect the independence and integrity of global health research.  The editorial, published in the most recent issue of BMJ Global Health, highlights the pervasiveness of donor and NGO influence on program evaluation findings and dissemination.

They Thought This HIV Strategy Couldn't Work. But It Did

In high-income countries like the U.S., the standard of care for people infected by HIV is to provide antiretroviral pills when the virus is found, even when there are no symptoms of AIDS. The strategy staves off the disease and has a second – big – benefit. It's been shown to prevent the spread of HIV in sexual encounters. It's called "treatment as prevention" (TasP in medical jargon), or "test and treat."

But in low-income countries, "test and treat" is not the typical approach to prevention. There's been no research to support it.