UW to Lead National Study of Drug Promoted by President Trump to Fight Coronavirus (Seattle Times, Includes Ruanne Barnabas)

Researchers at the University of Washington on Friday announced a major new study of the malaria drug President Donald Trump has praised as a possible, low-cost cure for COVID-19.

The clinical trial is one of dozens around the world aimed at providing definitive evidence about the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine, either alone or in combination with the antibiotic azithromycin, against the novel coronavirus.

Does Antimalarial Drug Prevent COVID-19? New DGH Study Seeks Answers (Ruanne Barnabas, ICRC)

The benefits of hydroxychloroquine being investigated in multi-site clinical trial launching in April

Researchers are investigating whether hydroxychloroquine – a commonly used anti-malarial and autoimmune drug – can prevent COVID-19.

A multi-site clinical trial, led by the University of Washington Department of Global Health/International Clinical Research Center (ICRC)  in collaboration with NYU Grossman School of Medicine, aims to definitively determine whether hydroxychloroquine can prevent transmission in people exposed to the virus.

Lessons from Africa on How to Fight an Infection (UW Medicine - Quotes Ruanne Barnabas)

In parts of Africa, where the HIV rate is 36 percent, researchers tested out a simple idea: They made access to care easier for people living with a chronic condition.

In a nearly three-year study in South Africa and Uganda, researchers used mobile vans in five communities to dispense care and treatment to 1,315 people living with HIV and not on antiretroviral treatment.

The randomized controlled trial, conducted between May 2016 and March 2019, found that viral suppression was 74 percent, compared to 63 percent for those seen in a clinic.

Simple Method to Prevent HIV in South Africa and Uganda Works (EurekAlert! - Quotes Ruanne Barnabas)

In parts of Africa, where the rate of HIV is high, researchers found that using mobile vans to dispense antiretroviral treatment and other care greatly increased viral suppression.

Researchers enrolled 1,315 people living with HIV and not on antiretroviral treatment in a nearly three-year study in South Africa and Uganda using mobile vans to dispense treatment.

Point-of-Care HIV Viral Load Testing Combined with Task Shifting to Improve Treatment Outcomes (The Lancet - Includes Paul Drain, Ruanne Barnabas, and Connie Celum)

Point-of-care HIV viral load testing combined with task shifting can improve viral suppression and retention in care by up to 14% and enable rapid care decisions, suggest results of a clinical trial led by the University of Washington and the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA).

UW study to shed light on effective strategies for cervical cancer elimination, address health disparities

A new UW study led by Ruanne Barnabas, Associate Professor, UW Department of Global Health/ International Clinical Research Center (ICRC), aims to shed light on effective strategies for cervical cancer elimination. The study will increase understanding of how a combination of screening and vaccination strategies can be used more effectively to eliminate cervical cancer in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

UW Awarded DREAMS Innovation Challenge to Bring PrEP to Adolescents in Kenya

The University of Washington is one of 56 DREAMS Innovation Challenge winners* announced on Monday by the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR); Janssen Pharmaceutica NV (Janssen), one of the Janssen pharmaceutical companies of Johnson & Johnson; and ViiV Healthcare.

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