Student Blog: My Graduate Discovery Fellowship at the CDC

Jay Vornhagen is 2017 graduate of the Pathobiology PhD program at the University of Washington Department of Global Health. He is currently completing a postdoc with Lakshmi Rajagopal at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. During his tenure at UW he published more than any other student since the Pathobiology program began in 1990. Jay received a Graduate Discovery Fellowship to work at the Centers for Disease Control from January-March, 2017 with Mary Kamb, Associate Director for Global Activities in the Division of STD Prevention.

The Washington Times: Women's Bacteria Thwarted Attempt at Anti-HIV Vaginal Gel

By Lauran Neergaard

Creating new HIV prevention tools for women has proven frustratingly slow and researchers have found another hurdle: bacteria in the reproductive tract.

A new study published Thursday examined what stalled an early attempt at an anti-HIV gel, and found certain types of vaginal bacteria broke down the protective medication before it had time to work.

The Globe and Mail: University of Victoria Researcher Close to Developing Syphilis Vaccine

By Andrea Woo

A University of Victoria researcher says she and a colleague are close to developing a vaccine for syphilis, a disease that has reached its highest rates in B.C. in 30 years.

Microbiologist Caroline Cameron and Sheila Lukehart, a professor in the University of Washington’s department of global health, have received a nearly $3-million grant from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. The grant will help fund preclinical trials.

Times Colonist: As Syphilis Cases Rise, UVic Leads Search for a Vaccine

By Richard Watts

A University of Victoria microbiologist and her American colleague are looking for a vaccine to prevent syphilis, a venereal disease on the rise worldwide.

UVic’s Caroline Cameron, a professor of biochemistry and microbiology, is joining with University of Washington’s Sheila Lukehart, a professor of medicine and global health, to develop a vaccine to stop syphilis before it gets started in a body.

“It’s a preventive treatment, not a cure,” Cameron said.