DGH Students Share Their Experiences as Gates Foundation Interns

Esther Choo and Andrew Secor, Department of Global Health PhD students in Implementation Science, interned for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation during the summer of 2019. Choo served as part of the Global Delivery Program and Secor worked with the Qualitative Sciences initiative under the Integrated Development Team.

“My main project focused on health systems and seeing if we can draw lessons from past experiences, while also thinking of ways we can improve evaluation methods going forward,” Choo said. 

Getting “What Works” to Those Who Need it Most: UW Implementation Science Course

From Myanmar and Mozambique to the US and Egypt, 90 participants from 22 countries around the world traveled to Seattle August 26-30 for the University of Washington Department of Global Health intensive summer course in The Fundamentals of Implementation Science in Global Health. The one-week course taught participants systematic approaches that can be used to bring research findings to on-the-ground settings, with the ultimate aim of improving health for people around the world.

UW Implementation Science Student Samantha Dolan Wins Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Grand Challenges Explorations Award

Samantha Dolan, a PhD student in Implementation Science, has received the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Grand Challenges Explorations award to use technology to strengthen health systems aimed at improving data use by healthcare workers in order to increase vaccination uptake amongst children in Kenya.

Students from Around the Globe Learn to Bridge the Gap Between Research and Practice

Translating remarkable advances in new medicines, vaccines, and diagnostic tools into practice that improve people’s lives on the ground can often be slow or uneven. To gain understanding of tools to effectively tackle this “know-do gap,” 72 students from 17 countries participated in UW Department of Global Health’s “Fundamentals of Implementation Science in Global Health” intensive course. 

Researchers Win $2.7 Million NIH Grant to Reduce Child Mortality in Mozambique

A project by the University of Washington, in partnership with the Ministry of Health in Mozambique, has received a five-year, $2.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development  to jump-start stalled declines in child mortality by improving interventions delivered at or near the time of birth.

The Seattle Times: Putting an End to Intestinal Worms

By University of Washington

For two billion people around the planet, anemia, weakness and malaise are part of daily life.

These symptoms are part of living with soil-transmitted helminths – more commonly known as intestinal worms – that inhabit victims’ bellies, sapping their nutrients and stunting their physical and cognitive development.

Northwest Public Health: Envisioning Healthy People in Sustainable Communities

How do we connect what we know about population health with what we do to improve it? The 2017 issue of Northwest Public Health examines the ties between social determinants and population health outcomes, and the successful policies, systems changes, interventions, innovations, and strategies being used to improve the health of whole populations.

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