Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation: Maternal Immunization Safety Monitoring in Low- And Middle-Income Countries: A Roadmap for Program Development

By Eve Lackritz, Andy Stergachis, and Maria Stepanchak

The first 28 days of life (the neonatal period) are the most vulnerable for a child’s survival. Worldwide, almost half of all deaths in children under five years old occur during the first 28 days of life. Despite progress in recent decades, neonatal mortality remains the highest in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and 99% of all neonatal deaths occur in LMICs.

What It Will Take for The World to Keep Getting Better

By Vanessa Bates Ramirez

Compared to life 100 years ago, life these days is pretty good by many measures. You’ve probably heard the statistics: poverty and infant mortality are down, life expectancy is up, and infectious diseases are being controlled, if not cured. In short, more humans than ever before are having their basic needs met, and it’s undeniable that the world is getting better.

CNBC: Project to Tackle Potential 'Post-Antibiotic Apocalypse' Launched with $3.2 Million Pledge

By Anmar Frangoul

Global charitable foundation Wellcome has announced a £2.4 million ($3.2 million) investment in a project to track the worldwide impact of superbugs.

The Global Burden of Disease antimicrobial resistance (AMR) project is to be launched today at the Call to Action conference in Berlin, Germany. Tim Jinks, Wellcome's head of drug resistant infections, said it would provide vital information on both the spread and impact of drug resistance.

Reuters: After Ebola, West Africa Must Brace for More Deadly Fevers: Study

By Kieran Guilbert

West Africa is most at risk of fatal haemorrhagic fever epidemics, including Ebola, researchers said on Wednesday, calling for greater preparedness to save lives.

A study in The Lancet medical journal assessed the likelihood of four viruses - Ebola, Lassa, Marburg and Crimean-Congo - spreading on the continent, charting progress from a first human case through to a potential pandemic.

NPR: People Are Living Longer in Places You Wouldn't Expect

By Emily Sohn

Where can people expect to live the longest?

The answer to that question is usually pretty predictable and often dependent on wealth: People generally live longer in richer countries. Like Japan and Switzerland, where average life expectancies exceed 83 years.

In lower income countries, expected years of life are often far shorter — hovering below 55 in a number of sub-Saharan countries, including Chad, Mozambique and Sierra Leone.

ASPPH: Washington Faculty Member Seeks to Close Treatment Gaps for Global Mental Health

As a doctoral student at the University of Washington School of Public Health, Dr. Bradley Wagenaar laid the foundation for a career in global mental health research and implementation science.

A study published from his dissertation for the department of epidemiology described patterns of mental health care in central Mozambique’s Sofala province. Additional studies showed the high rate of suicide attempts and deaths and the lack of essential mental health medication.

CleanTechnica: Higher Carbon Dioxide Levels May Result in Less Nutritious Food

By Steve Hanley

Most of us learned about photosynthesis when we were in high school. Plants use carbon dioxide and sunlight to make the food they need to grow. That means higher carbon dioxide levels should be good for plants, right? Absolutely, says Republican Congressman Lamar Smith of Texas. He is a firmly committed climate change denier who is the chairman of the House Committee on Science.

The Guardian: Poor Diet is a Factor in One in Five Deaths, Global Disease Study Reveals

By Sarah Boseley

Poor diet is a factor in one in five deaths around the world, according to the most comprehensive study ever carried out on the subject.

Millions of people are eating the wrong sorts of food for good health. Eating a diet that is low in whole grains, fruit, nuts and seeds and fish oils and high in salt raises the risk of an early death, according to the huge and ongoing study Global Burden of Disease.

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