Who Gets COVID-19 Vaccine Next? Older Adults and 'Frontline Essential Workers,' CDC Advisers Recommend (quotes Beth Bell)

By Jacqueline Howard and Jen Christensen, CNN

(CNN)Vaccine advisers to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voted 13-1 on Sunday to recommend that both older adults, ages 75 and older, and "frontline essential workers" including first responders be next in line to receive Covid-19 vaccines.

That would put those people in "Phase 1b" of allocating the vaccine nationwide.

The Health Effects of Climate Change (includes Kris Ebi)

The December 2020 issue of Health Affairs is the first-ever focused exclusively on the intersection of climate and health. It covers topics including the health sector’s contribution to carbon emissions and other forms of pollution, how communities are affected by and adapting to the changing climate, and policies to protect against further damage. Kristie Ebi, UW CHanGE, served as theme adviser of the issue. 

No Country is Immune from Climate-Change Health Impacts (includes Jeremy Hess)

A global report and U.S. brief published in The Lancet show that further climate protections could save millions of lives.

Each year, The Lancet Countdown tracks more than 40 indicators on links between health and climate change. This year presents the most worrisom outlook to date as key trends worsen. The latest report finds that, with climate action, the lives of millions could be improved and saved.

How Widespread is Mask-Wearing in Washington? UW Study Aims to Find Out, Starting in King County (includes Judith Wasserheit and Brandon Guthrie)

By Sandi Doughton Seattle Times staff reporter

We’ve all noticed that fellow shopper at the grocery store with a mask snugged over his mouth — but not his nose. Maybe you’ve also got a neighbor who tugs her mask down to talk. Or perhaps you’ve detoured around groups of barefaced teenagers jostling each other in a park.

COVID-19: CDC Advisory Committee Hones in on Vaccine Rollout Recommendations (includes Beth Bell)

Jake EllisonUW News

When a vaccine to fight COVID-19 has been approved by the FDA for distribution, it’s unlikely that at first there will be enough doses for everyone. Consequently, the United States will need an equitable and effective plan for who gets those first doses, how they get them and who’s next.

Just as important, that plan — like the vaccine itself — has to be trusted and accepted by the general public.

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